06
February
2019
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05:23 PM
America/Chicago

Executive summary: Hard at rest

Vol. 75, No. 1 / January-February 2019

Summary

For quite some time I’ve wanted to run a marathon. Over the years, I’ve ran a few half marathons, and I enjoy running for many reasons. It’s a great way to relieve stress. It provides a period of solitude away from email, phone calls, and other interruptions. It is “my time.”

by Sebrina A. Barrett, Executive Director of The Missouri Bar

Sebrina Barrett - Medium Size PhotoFor quite some time I’ve wanted to run a marathon. Over the years, I’ve ran a few half marathons, and I enjoy running for many reasons. It’s a great way to relieve stress. It provides a period of solitude away from email, phone calls, and other interruptions. It is “my time.”

So a few months ago, I signed up for a marathon —and not just any race, but the Disney World marathon. As I write this, I’m in the final days of training, with the race just 10 days away. This is a period where one should cut back on the miles; a time to rest and recharge before the big day. For someone as high-strung as I am, that is easier said than done. However, my legs are forcing me into what is a mandated downtime due to significant pain in both knees. I should have listened to my body a week ago and cut back on the miles, rather than further stress my knees before the race. But, stubbornly, I didn’t listen. I kept pushing, and in doing so I jeopardized my ability to finish the race due to injury.

Lesson learned: For some of us, resting is hard, but necessary. Resting should be part of our overall plan for wellness and avoidance of burnout. In our profession, so many of us just keep pushing forward until we collapse, rendering us unable to help others. In an article on burnout, The Missouri Bar’s Lawyers Assistance Program (MOLAP) Director Anne Chambers notes that during burnout, both the quantity and quality of work may decline, and as demands increase, our “coping skills can become overloaded.” Striving to do more, we become less able to do anything at all, which leads to feelings of failure and anger.

The article suggests strategies to recover from burnout, including considering what gives your work and personal life meaning and finding ways to recharge and focus on that, as well as seeking support. The beginning of a new year provides the ideal time to prioritize what matters most and develop strategies on how to focus on those priorities. MOLAP is one of the many benefits offered to Missouri Bar members, and can help you address stress, burnout, and anxiety. MOLAP provides free, confidential counseling, and is only a phone call away — 800-688-7859. In addition, there are many resources, including the article mentioned above, on the MOLAP website, which can be accessed at www.mobar.orgt/molap.

If your new year priorities include finding ways to become more efficient, we can help. For 75 years, The Missouri Bar has been here to help you even better serve your clients. We continue to add to the number of member benefits that your Bar provides. Active members already have free access to Fastcase and discounts on practice management applications, hotel stays, website development, and credit card payment processing. In the coming year, we will launch discounts on products related to travel, office products, audio and web conferencing, marketing, payroll processing, and more. These are just a sampling of the many ways that your Bar works for you—for more information go to www.mobar.org/memberbenefits. We are always looking for ways to update and expand our member benefits. Our Member Resources and Services Committee reviews potential benefits and discount offerings, and we welcome your suggestions on benefits to help you meet your 2019 practice goals. Suggestions can be sent via email to Lucas Boling at lboling@mobar.org.